BEFORE YOU INVEST

Before considering an investment in the Fund, you should understand that you could lose money.


The principal risk of investing in value funds is that the price of the security may not approach its anticipated value.


Investing in smaller companies involves special risks, including higher volatility and lower liquidity. 


Investing in mid-cap stocks may carry more risk than investing in stocks of larger, more well-established companies.


Foreign securities are subject to interest rate, currency exchange rate, economic, and political risks. These risks may be greater for emerging markets.


Russell 1000® Value Index measures the performance of the large-cap value segment of the U.S. equity universe. It includes those Russell 1000® Index companies with lower price-to-book ratios and lower expected growth values.


An investment cannot be made directly into an index. 


Standard Deviation measures how widely dispersed a fund's returns have been over a specified period of time. A high standard deviation indicates that the range is wide, implying greater potential for volatility.

Alpha measures a fund's risk-adjusted performance and is expressed as an annualized percentage.

Beta is a measure of historical volatility relative to an appropriate index (benchmark) based on its investment objective. A beta greater than 1.00 indicates volatility greater than the benchmark's. 

R-Squared measures the percentage of a fund's movements that result from movements in the index.

Sharpe Ratio shown is calculated for the past 36-month period by dividing annualized excess returns by annualized standard deviation.

Annual Turnover Rate is as of the most recent annual shareholder report.

1. As of 12/31/21. MainStay Epoch U.S. Equity Yield Fund (Class A) rankings in the Lipper Multi-Cap Value Funds category: one-year: #519 out of 637; five-year: #325 out of 538; 10-year: #245 out of 393. Past performance is no guarantee of future results, which may vary.


How Barron’s Ranks the Fund Families

All mutual and exchange-traded funds are required to report their returns (to regulators as well as in advertising and marketing material) after fees are deducted, to better reflect what investors would actually experience. But our aim is to measure manager skill, independent of expenses beyond annual management fees. That’s why we calculate returns before any 12b-1 fees are deducted. Similarly, fund loads, or sales charges, aren’t included in our calculation of returns.

Each fund’s performance is measured against all of the other funds in its Refinitiv Lipper category, with a percentile ranking of 100 being the highest and one the lowest. This result is then weighted by asset size, relative to the fund family’s other assets in its general classification. If a family’s biggest funds do well, that boosts its overall ranking; poor performance in its biggest funds hurts a firm’s ranking.

To be included in the ranking, a firm must have at least three funds in the general equity category, one world equity, one mixed equity (such as a balanced or target-date fund), two taxable bond funds, and one national tax-exempt bond fund.

Single-sector and country equity funds are factored into the rankings as general equity. We exclude all passive index funds, including pure index, enhanced index, and index-based, but include actively managed ETFs and so-called smart-beta ETFs, which are passively managed but created from active strategies.

Finally, the score is multiplied by the weighting of its general classification, as determined by the entire Lipper universe of funds. The category weightings for the one-year results in 2021 were general equity, 37.1%; mixed asset, 20.6%; world equity, 16.8%; taxable bond, 20.9%; and tax-exempt bond, 4.5%.

The category weightings for the five-year results were general equity, 37.3%; mixed asset, 21%; world equity, 16.5%; taxable bond, 20.8%; and tax-exempt bond, 4.4%. For the 10-year list, they were general equity, 38.6%; mixed asset, 19.2%; world equity, 16.9%; taxable bond, 20.5%; and tax-exempt bond, 4.8%

The scoring: Say a fund in the general U.S. equity category has $500 million in assets, accounting for half of the firm’s assets in that category, and its performance lands it in the 75th percentile for the category. The first calculation would be 75 times 0.5, which comes to 37.5. That score is then multiplied by 37.1%, general equity’s overall weighting in Lipper’s universe. So it would be 37.5 times 0.371, which equals 13.9. Similar calculations are done for each fund in our study. Then the numbers are added for each category and overall. The shop with the highest total score wins. The same process is repeated to determine the five- and 10-year rankings.

Source: Barron’s, 2/21/22. Overall, MainStay Funds ranked number 9 for the one-year period, 25 for the five-year period, and 31 for the 10-year period ended December 31, 2021, out of 51, 49, and 45 fund families, respectively. Past performance is no guarantee of future results, which will vary. For the most recent MainStay Funds performance, please visit our web site at newyorklifeinvestments.com.

The S&P 500 Index measures the performance of 500 widely held stocks in US equity market. Standard and Poor's chooses member companies for the index based on market size, liquidity and industry group representation. Included are the stocks of industrial, financial, utility, and transportation companies. Since mid 1989, this composition has been more flexible and the number of issues in each sector has varied. It is market capitalization-weighted.

MainStay Epoch U.S. Equity Yield Fund  Class A: EPLPX | Class B: EPLBX | Class C: EPLKX | Class I: EPLCX | Class INV: EPLIX | Class R1: EPLRX | Class R2: EPLSX | Class R3: EPLTX | Class R6: EPLDX | Class SI: EPLMX

The Morningstar Rating™ for funds, or "star rating", is calculated for managed products (including mutual funds, variable annuity and variable life subaccounts, exchange-traded funds, closed-end funds, and separate accounts) with at least a three-year history. Exchange-traded funds and open-ended mutual funds are considered a single population for comparative purposes. It is calculated based on a Morningstar Risk-Adjusted Return measure that accounts for variation in a managed product's monthly excess performance, placing more emphasis on downward variations and rewarding consistent performance (this does not include the effects of sales charges, loads, and redemption fees). The top 10% of products in each product category receive 5stars, the next 22.5% receive 4 stars, the next 35% receive 3 stars, the next 22.5% receive 2 stars, and the bottom 10% receive 1 star. The Overall Morningstar Rating for a managed product is derived from a weighted average of the performance figures associated with its three-, five-, and 10-year (if applicable) Morningstar Rating metrics. The weights are: 100% three-year rating for 36-59 months of total returns, 60% five-year rating/40% three-year rating for 60-119 months of total returns, and 50% 10-year rating/30% five-year rating/20% three-year rating for 120 or more months of total returns. While the 10-year overall star rating formula seems to give the most weight to the 10-year period, the most recent three-year period actually has the greatest impact because it is included in all three rating periods.